Journey
 
 
                                                                                    
Journeys have a way of finding our pathways.
Whether sought or circumstantial, each journey shapes how we walk in
the world.
 
We cannot help but learn by
being
    some place
    at some time.
 
Imagination becomes our ally,
connects us with the unknown and the breath of possibility.
 
Spirit edges us forward,
                                shaping
                                         shifting
                                                shadowing
                                                          what is yet to come.
 
                                                                                        (Meyer, 2003, p. 11)
 
 
This thesis journey began with a desire to reconnect, to slow down, to sink into the rhythm of life, to ruminate, question, and give time and space to things other than my rational mind.
 
Sometimes I think I have become my mind; I am not my mind.
 
I did not know how the desire would emerge but because it came from a center place within me, I knew if I ignored the call a vital part of me would once again die. The quiet stillness within, which I spent most of my life running from, needed a medium to express itself and I chose to honour that rather then listen to the contrary voices that were telling me I would surely fail.
 
I am scared.
    I am terrified.
 
Is what I am writing right?
            Good enough?
                What will people think?
 
I let the fear move through me but not torment and become me.
 
Hokusai says,
            “Don’t be afraid.
            Love, feel, let life take you by the hand” (Keyes, n.d.)
 
I have a choice.
        I let life
            take me by the hand.
 
                                                
“I didn’t know why I wanted to put my heart and guts into language, to put myself on the line creatively that way. I just knew that if I didn’t do it, I would surely die, so if I was going to die anyway, I might as well die having tried to do something courageous”
(Brandt, 1996, p. 156).